Posted in Indianapolis theater: previews

Openings for the weekend of 3/23

IndyFringe Theater: OnyxFest: A Celebration of African-American Playwrights

Onyx Fest is Indianapolis’ first and only theater festival dedicated to the stories of African-American playwrights. The inaugural Onyx Fest in 2012 was developed in response to the lack of diversity on stage and in audiences of Indianapolis’ theaters; except the IndyFringe Theater. IndyFringe has actively worked towards embracing diversity in the Indianapolis theater scene and these efforts have yielded fruit by working with African-American playwrights to change the Indianapolis theatrical landscape of storytellers, actors, and audiences at the IndyFringe Theater. Onyx Fest is another step towards institutionalizing the IndyFringe Theater’s commitment to provide support and a performance venue that is inclusive of all playwrights who make up the Indianapolis community.

The importance of Onyx Fest: Develop and present voices not often heard and showcase the work of established voices. Engage new and established audiences in the art and craft of production Bring new excitement to theatre and grow Onyx Fest as a center for African-American playwrights.

Impact of Onyx Fest: Growth of new works, new audiences, new performing companies, new Fringe Festival shows. Imagine the new voices being heard.

Dear Bobby: The Musical 

Playwright: Angela Jackson Brown; Music: Peter Davis

dear-bobby-v9-2Judith Rosenstein and Annabelle Strong are two twelve-year-old girls from opposite sides of Indianapolis but their stories are similar. Both girls are growing up without their mothers and both have two very loving fathers and brothers.This play explores the very real struggles and successes of the Jewish community and the black community to unite as one in Indianapolis during this time. It explores in a larger scope, the tumultuous times everyone was living through as they watched in horror the assassination of their leaders.

www.indyfringe.org/theatre-show/dear-bobby-musical

Forever Moore  

Playwright: Lanetta Overton

The holidays are quickly approaching, and the Moore family is planning to visit with one another. Ruby and Michael are anticipating the arrival of their three beloved sons. Tyrique is the eldest son, he is a lawyer who has worked hard to make partner at Lax and Chism Law firm. He’s in the right business, but he may soon need a lawyer of his own. Trent is the middle son who is currently in his last year at Notre Dame, his passion is football, but he has a love for something else which could lead to his demise. Lastly, the youngest son Jywan is a military man that has not always had a voice, but is in desperation of trying to be heard. The Moore’s will share more than good food and laughs over the holiday. It’s time for this family to show they will be there for one another despite the odds they may face.

http://www.indyfringe.org/theatre-show/forever-moore

Take My Hand (A Blues Man’s Path to Gospel)

Playwright: Lillie Evans, www.lilliebarnettevans.com

takemyhandThomas Dorsey, a self confident composer and self-taught pianist, is determined to make his mark. In his early twenties he was well on his way to being one of the most prolific composer in blues history and was sought after by some of the top blues artist of his time. But, what’s gospel have to do with it? His vision is to marry church music with blues rhythms — it was called gospel. Pressured by those around him, he is unable to choose between the blues he loves and the secular music he was striving to change. The answer comes at a heavy price but heralds a song that anointed Dorsey as the “father of gospel music.”

http://www.indyfringe.org/theatre-show/%E2%80%9Ctake-my-hand%E2%80%9D

Fat Turtle Theatre Company: The Quest for Don Quixote (Indiana Premiere)

quiote
Fat Turtle Theatre Company: “The Quest for Don Quixote”

Playwright Ben Eisenberg sits in a Starbucks on the eve of the first rehearsal of his stage adaptation of Don Quixote. There’s just one problem — he hasn’t written it. He hasn’t written anything in years, and his status as wunderkind playwright is quickly fading to has-been hack. His agent is apoplectic, the producer’s advance is long since spent, and adapting a 1,000-page Renaissance adventure is beginning to feel a bit like tilting at windmills. But then — whether from a stroke of genius or a near-lethal dosage of caffeine and Xanax — Starbucks itself begins to transform, and the errant knight arises in this delightfully theatrical and hilarious retelling of Cervantes’ classic tale.

Civic Theatre: And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie

civic
Civic Theatre: “And Then There Were None”

Ten strangers are summoned to a remote island. All that the guests have in common is a wicked past they’re unwilling to reveal and a secret that will seal their fate. For each has been marked for murder. As the weather turns and the group is cut off from the mainland, the bloodbath begins and one by one they are brutally murdered in accordance with the lines of a sinister nursery rhyme. One of Christie’s darkest tales and a masterpiece of dramatic construction, its growing sense of dread and unfaltering tension will keep you guessing to the very end.

  • March 23-April 8; Wednesdays-Saturdays at 7 p.m.; Sundays at 2 p.m.; last Saturday at 5 p.m.
  • Prices vary
  • http://civictheatre.org

Indianapolis Opera: South Pacific

Rodgers and Hammerstein’s endearing classic deals with many socially significant issues of today: war, romance, racism and battle fatigue. Rodgers wrote most of the lyrical melodies specifically for opera stars, including Ezio Pinza, the lead bass at the Metropolitan Opera for 22 years. Audience members will be moved by some of the most popular songs in all of musical theater including “Some Enchanted Evening” and “Younger than Springtime.”

  • Friday, March 23 at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, March 24 (sold out); Sunday, 25 at 2:30 p.m.
  • Schrott Center for the Arts
  • $25-$55
  • www.indyopera.org
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freelance editor, writer, and theater critic

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