Posted in Indianapolis theater: previews

Openings for the weekend of 3/1

District Theatre: Yank! — A WWII Love Story

yank
District Theatre: “Yank! — A WWII Love Story”

This plushly scored piece by brothers Joseph and David Zellnik is an unabashed throwback to the golden era of Broadway, in which the creators have attempted to imagine “the show that Rodgers and Hammerstein never wrote.” Indeed, it’s the show that no classic Broadway team could possibly have written, as it deals with the subject of gay men in the US army at a time when the penalty was three years in military prison.

Once in modern San Francisco a young man found a diary of 60 years old in a junk shop. Having read it, he discovered that it were the personal notes made by a soldier in 1943. When the young farmer Stu, living in the Midwest, was 18 years old, he received a summons to the army. In training camp, located in the Texas, young recruits learnt martial weapons that they had to know during the military service in the battles in the Pacific. For Stu, it was very hard to stay in colleagues’ circle, as he hid from them his homosexuality. For a young man, it became even more difficult to stay in the camp, when he had the urge to brave Mitch. Falling in love with a comrade, Stu did not know how to tell him about his feelings. Mitch also realized his awakened sexual desire for men, but he resisted, remembering girlfriends back home. 

When recruits fulfilled training military skills, they were put on a train and sent to the west coast of the country. Taking advantage of the moment, Stu confessed Mitch of his feelings and kissed him. Soon it turned out that a colleague was experiencing response cravings to this young man. Caught in the midst of battle, many soldiers lost their hearts. The same emotion came to Stu, who was terrified after seeing the massacre. Soon the young man met with a reporter-gay from Yank Magazine. Artie got the young man assigned to him as a photographer. Getting rid Stu of the nightmare of fighting and fear of death, he also alienated him from partner Mitch. Under the guidance of an experienced homosexual, young man discovered the secret gay world, which existed in the army. Stu trusted all new experiences to his diary. Only after many months, he was able to be reunited with a former lover. When a young man’s notebook with personal records fell into the wrong hands, it has caused detrimental effects for the pair. Stu had to endure not only the battle with the enemies of his country, but also with colleagues. 

  • March 1-24, Thursdays-Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 4 p.m.
  • $25 general admission; $20 seniors & students; $15 for active & retired military (with ID)
  • www.indyfringe.org/theatre-show/yank

Footlite Musicals: Singin’ in the Rain

singin
Footlite Musicals’ “Singin’ in the Rain.” photo by photogary.net

This show is faithfully adapted by Broadway legends Betty Comden and Adolph Green from their original award-winning screenplay. The must-see classic musical is filled with every memorable moment from the film, including extraordinary dance numbers, a downpour of unforgettable songs, and a real rain shower.

  • March 1-17, Thursdays-Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2:30 p.m.
  • $15-$25
  • footlite.org

https://www.facebook.com/Footlite/videos/1155357184630711/

Phoenix Theatre: The Hotel Nepenthe

nepthene
Ben Asaykwee in Phoenix Theatre’s “The Hotel Nepenthe”

A gruesome murder, a fatal accident, and a missing infant—anything can happen at Hotel Nepenthe, a locale straight out of the film noir of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Four actors portray nineteen characters in this poignant dark comedy that oscillates between absurdity and deeply emotional honesty. Warning: This show has strong adult content and situations.

https://www.facebook.com/indyfirebird/videos/624633921290875/

 

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freelance editor, writer, and theater critic

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